What You Need to Know Before Painting Brick

    Sure, painted brick can be a great look. But you need to take some risks into account. Here’s how to paint brick like a pro

    Sometimes brick looks beautiful — and sometimes it’s an eyesore. Depending on the style of your home, a brick fireplace or wall may detract from your ideal ambiance. Although painting the brick in your home has been touted as an easy DIY fix, it has its downsides. Be careful before whipping out your roller and painter’s tape — there are some important considerations to keep in mind before tackling this home project.

    We talked with three professionals to get their take on painting brick. Diana Zumeta ofBrick Restoration, Scott Crocker of Crocker Breslin Architects and Rick Watson from Sherwin-Williams give us their two cents on the risks involved in painting brick.

    Birdhouse Design

    Should You Paint Your Brick?

    Think carefully before painting interior or exterior brick. Brick is chosen as a building material because of its durable and built-in color — of which there are more choices today. “Most brick was never intended to be painted,” says Crocker. “Long-term, maintenance-free painted brick requires careful planning.” According to the Brick Industry Association, if you paint your exterior brick, you should be repaint it every three to five years.

    The quality of your brick also should determine your choice. Brick that’s chipping, deteriorating, molding or in overall poor condition is always a bad candidate for paint. Paint blocks the natural pores in the brick’s surface, which can cause existing problems to become exaggerated over time. “When water seeps in through the mortar, it also seeps into the brick through the inside, and since the bulk of the surface area is blocked, the moisture cannot evaporate off,” says Zumeta. Often this causes the paint to chip off.

    Also remember that removing paint from bricks is no easy process. Chemicals have to be used, and often the paint won’t come completely off. If you don’t like the look, you may be stuck with it.

    The Risks

    “Ask yourself if you’re covering up something that should be addressed separately,” says Crocker. He recommends getting in touch with the original owners or the builder who installed the brick, whenever possible, to uncover any problems that might arise. “You have to be very careful when you’re changing the exterior makeup of a wall,” says Crocker.

    Moisture is a concern that’s usually apparent right off the bat. Water can enter brick through brick pores, incomplete mortar joints, sills, copings and other gaps. Make sure your brick is completely dry before you paint it — the risk of long-term or immediate damage is less likely.

    The natural chemical property of bricks may affect your paint’s durability as well. According to the Brick Industry Association, most bricks are neutral, but mortar often has a basic alkalinity. Paint products can be affected, so alkaline-resistant primer is usually recommended.

    “Efflorescence” is a big word for that annoying white residue that often appears on older brick walls. This residue is made up of deposits of water-soluble salt buildup, often from moisture inside the brick. Remove the efflorescence with water and a stiff brush before painting your brick, and wait to see if it returns. If it does, you may have a bigger problem on your hands that requires professional help.

    View Original Artitle on houzz.com

    Trackback from your site.

    Steve Baker

    Steve comes to the world of real estate with nearly 30 years of Marketing and Graphic Design experience. These two very important skills make him ideal for this profession. In 2017 he achieved his highest accolade to date becoming a global, award-winning real estate graphic design/marketing recipient. Mr. Baker is not only a REALTOR but the Director of Marketing for Rinehart Realty. His education and work experience also include a Bachelor degree in Education and degrees in Radiologic Technology and Medical Ultrasonography. He was a pioneer in the field of Radiology PACS development and Radiology Voice Recognition adoption and implementation in southwest Virginia. His previous positions as Director of Radiology and PACS Administrator lead to enormous development in resources and project management necessary to succeed in the field of real estate. Steve is a writer and developer for a variety of blogs and real estate publications. He recently completed his first book of quotations and is currently working on a Real Estate Marketing book. He is a strong supporter of the United Way, having won a past Campaign Coordinator of the Year award. He is also a strong advocate for breast cancer research and education. Mr. Baker has a history of work experience developed on the foundation of a strong work ethic, the pursuit of excellence, quality, honesty and integrity.

    Leave a Reply

    Contact Us Now

    Any questions, comments, or feedback